2017 Summer Holiday Schedule

We will be closed on the following days.

CLOSED July 22nd, 2017- July 30th, 2017 (Summer Holiday)

CLOSED August 11th, 2017 (National Holiday)

Your kind understanding and cooperation is highly appreciated.

 

CDC Committee recommends against Flumist for 2017-2018

At its June 21-22 meeting, the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended against use of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV; FluMist) for the 2017-2018 flu season because of the vaccine’s reduced efficacy.

Therefore, the American Clinic Tokyo will not import or offer FluMist this season. We hope this willl change and look forward to be able to provide more options in the future.

Urinary tract infections: Treat with antibiotics as soon as possible

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) happen when bacteria get into the urethra and travel up into the bladder. They are among the most common infections in people, and antibiotic treatment is usually helpful in treating an infection.

If the infection stays just in the bladder, it is a called “cystitis.” Common symptoms include, pain or burning when urinating, urinary frequency or urgency, blood in the urine. Treatment will usually require a 3-5 day course of antibiotics.

But if the infection travels up past the bladder and into the kidneys, it is called “pyelonephritis.” Common symptoms include, fever, flank pain, nausea and vomiting. Treatment will usually require a 7-14 day course of antibiotics.

More information can be found here: https://www.uptodate.com/contents/urinary-tract-infections-in-adolescents-and-adults-beyond-the-basics

If you have any questions, feel free to call us at 03-6441-0969 and talk with one of our nurses.

Morning-after-pill NorLevo® and oral contraceptives in Japan

Oral contraceptive (levonorgestrel) NorLevo® has been released for prescription in Japan on April 2016. It is better known as Plan B (morning after pill) in the United States. This is a single pill you take by mouth. It must be taken within 72 hours (3 days) after unprotected sex or birth control failure to help prevent pregnancy. The sooner you take it, the better it will work for you.

When used as directed, oral contraceptives are generally safe and effective. But it shouldn’t be used as regular birth control, because it’s not as effective. Some may experience side effects, such as: Nausea, Abdominal cramps, Fatigue, Headache, Dizziness, Breast tenderness, Vomiting, and a period that is lighter, heavier, early, or late. It is contraindicated during pregnancy as the indication is for emergency contraception only. This pill will not protect you against HIV/AIDS or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

You will know it worked when you get your next period, which should come at the expected time. If your period is more than a week late, it is possible you may be pregnant. You should get a pregnancy test and follow up with your doctor. If you have any questions, feel free to call us at 03-6441-0969 and talk with one of our nurses.